BOOKS FOR DAD

26 January, 2016

"HEALING AND REPATRIATION" INITIATIVE FOR THE INCARCERATED: MOVING INCARCERATED MEN INTO THE INTERNATIONAL MEN'S DAY EQUATION


 
 
          Since 2000, I have published the essays and poems of Incarcerated Men from Maine to Hawaii.  Their essays and poems are moving, inspiring, and instructive.  It is an experience that has helped to change and continues to change my perspective about many things on many different levels.   In 2009, I was selected to become the United States Coordinator for International Men’s Day.  I soon discovered that Incarcerated Men were not being included in the International Men’s Day observances.  This was not being done on purpose.  But we are equally culpable for acts of omission as well as acts of commission.  This discovery moved me to create an initiative that would bring Incarcerated Men into the International Men’s Day “equation”. 


             In 2012, for the first time, International Men’s Day was observed in an American correctional facility – the Clinton Correctional Facility located in Dannemora, New York.  On Monday, 19 November 2012, the Clinton Correctional Facility joined Men, Women, institutions, and organizations throughout our global village in observing 2012 International Men’s Day under the theme, “Helping Men and Boys Live Longer, Happier, Healthier Lives”. The success of the inaugural observance of 2012 International Men’s Day at the Clinton Correctional Facility spawned the creation of the International Men’s Day “Healing and Repatriation Initiative” in January 2013.   Observances of International Men’s Day at correctional facilities have taken the form of workshops and discussion groups about a variety of issues that include but are not limited to education, reintegration, and reducing violence and crime in communities.  A number of International Men’s Day Coordinators in other nations are now considering implementing this initiative in their respective countries.   

          For the second consecutive year, on Wednesday, 19 November 2014 -- International Men's Day under the theme, "Working Together For Men And Boys" --  Bare Hill Correctional Facility located in Malone, New York participated in the International Men's Day "Healing and Repatriation" Initiative which provides Incarcerated Men with the opportunity to join individuals, institutions, and organizations in 80 nations in celebrating International Men's Day.  Under the leadership of Mr. Carry Greaves, a Senior Contributing Editor for IN SEARCH OF FATHERHOOD(R) and the Empowerment Coordinator for International Men's Day, a "Call To Prayer" was observed in conjunction with the International Day of Prayer for Men and Boys at Bare Hill Correctional Facility on 19 November 2014.  The "Call To Prayer" was followed by a discussion forum consisting of Incarcerated Men who were in their 20s.  The young men talked about their past and a vision for their future.
 
Mr. Greaves had this to say about the event:
 
"The International Men's Day observance was beautiful, yet emotional. The participants gave testimony as to what they would like to accomplish in the future. They spoke about their lifestyle and families and what landed them in prison. The participants are very young men who, for the most part, did not have a father growing up.  All of them blame the fact of not having a father in their homes as the reason why they went astray, joined gangs, sold drugs, and came to prison.  But what I realized is that many of the youth today definitely need a constant guide in their lives.  Someone who will take them under their wings and guide them in the right direction.  There are so many variables as to why they are living a destructive lifestyle.  But we can't continue to just treat the effect and ignore the cause.  We have to go to the root of the problem. We have to take a look at their education, their family life, and go full steam ahead and inspire them to look within so that we bring out the best in them.  It's a lot of work, but we can't ``give  up."      
                                                                                                                                          

          The International Men's Day "Healing and Repatriation" Initiative provides approximately 2,500,000 souls in the United States who are incarcerated in the United States with an opportunity to participate in a global event which encourages them to engage in critical thinking about issues that affect them, their families and loved ones, and the communities in which they have lived and will one day return to.  It is about helping them to see themselves as ‘part of a whole’.  It is one of the many ‘first steps’ that must be taken to heal and “reconnect” spiritually, psychologically, and emotionally approximately 700,000 souls who are released from American prisons every year and place them on the path to successful reintegration into society.  

 

25 January, 2016

EMOTIONAL CHALLENGES OF YOUNG MEN AND BOYS IN AFRICA: MR. NKOMO LETHUKUTHULA--A VOICE FOR AFRICA'S COMMUNITY OF MEN


 
Thank you once again for this special opportunity given to me to make a contribution to the MEN AND BOYS OF COLOR GLOBAL COMMUNITY EMOTIONAL HEALTH TELEPHONE CONFERENCE -- on this special day -- where we effectively seek to emotionally liberate boys and young men, and men, in general. I will attempt to use a narrative on my situation by sharing my past and present experiences.   What I experienced is generally experienced by many boys and young men across Africa. 


I grew up on the commercial farms in Zimbabwe, Matabeleland, South Province, Figtree area. These colonial farms were originally the prime fertile land that had been allotted to the soldiers who had participated in the wars of invasion in the mid to end-1800s and that saw the subjugation and total destruction of the kingdoms around my region and  Africa in general. Those wars marked the end of our independence and freedom and the beginning of colonial rule.  These farms up until early 2000 were formally owned by the white farmers most of whom were the last generation of the original settlers. In 1981,one year after attaining independence my parents teamed up with other parents of the same interest, pooled funds together and bought a farm right in the middle of these white farmers, attempting to start up what they called a cooperative project ,a move that tasted so bitter in the farmers' mouths that they decided to send us to court so as to reverse our move.  Their argument being that we were not commercially skilled farmers.  We  were too many.  We would therefore cause so much trouble: deforestation, soil erosion,poaching,theft,cattle rustling,and all sorts of crimes. They won the case. We were given a few days to pack and leave!


The question was:  How could one evict  people who had purchased a property in a very legal and formal way? No one could understand how the farmers won the case which was so simple and obvious. Our parents refused to comply.  So having defied the court order  the law came down hard on us.  The police came with the machines of destruction.  I was very young – around mid-primary school age. Our parents had told us they had found a good prime place for us to freely and happily stay. They had assured us the place was ours, not a lease arrangement,  like we had done before. We had built a few African mud huts, so we were much excited to build a good four roomed "white man's house" in a few years to come." What surprised us is that the police were destroying our homes in the presence and with the help of the same white farmers.  As boys of school going age this really hurt us -- watching our homes destroyed, our powerless parents watching their homes  going up in flames! No action at all!? We became so confused and angry. We asked so many questions. Did our parents lie to us? Did they illegally  grab this land? Do the police hate Black people? What is it that we did to deserve this? The whites were shouting every time – everywhere shouting at our parents -- shouting at us to "Go back to the reserves!". "Reserves" are dry hot tsetse-fly infested places where the indigenous people were dumped during the partition period in my country. They were moved from their prime fertile lands to those so-called "reserves". The police packed our few things into their not so big trucks and dumped us by the main road, leaving behind most our valuable property in the mess of the rain. Mothers and young children were crying. As boys, men to be, we felt challenged.  We  felt defeated  It crushed our spirit.  We felt we were disappointing .  We felt so emotionally tormented.  It felt like we failed our families. We watched in the open – where it was heavily raining --standing by the roadside  as our homes went down in flame.  Our fathers silently  shaking their heads in despair. 


We camped for weeks on the side of road,naturally attracting the eyes of the media.  After a few days of living by the roadside, our story was in the papers and on televisions.  A few more days later, we were visited by the local council people, and then later by the members of Parliament. Our case was reviewed in a more lawful and fair manner.  In a few more weeks we won the case with the help of a former farm owner.  We went back and started rebuilding our homes -- unfortunately without any form of compensation on the  damaged property and torched homes.  So much of material, psychological and emotional damage, to some of us permanently remains. 


As boys we had learned that we were in the second line of defense, right behind our fathers, defending our homes and our families. When we witnessed our homes going down without a fight from our fathers it brought a mixture of anger and confusion.   Were our fathers weak? Scared? Do white people own us, are they above the law? We asked so many questions. In our African traditions in general, it is a taboo to ask our parents challenging, deep ,searching questions -- especially questioning their authority, their capacities, and their strengths and weaknesses.  We were sure our parents were powerless but we could not understand why,if indeed they bought the property – why were they evicted by the police? Though we finally got our land back,as we grew up around the commercial farms we became so angry.  We became more prejudiced, stigmatized and stigmatizing.  Hatred and anger built up as we experienced more farm cruelties in every corner. Farms are remote places, far away from the modern civilisation, some so far away from the main roads that the farmers  committed a lot of crime and  abuse which went unreported. We witnessed the farmers  shooting our dogs and goats and almost every week,our livestock were impounded if they encroached their farms, and caged inside the kraals(which were  called skeeds), and  starved until they succumbed to death. We witnessed the farm guards and their bosses beating up our mothers and sisters when they were found on their farms collecting firewood and water during the desperate dry seasons. We heard some unconfirmed reports of young men who died from beatings or work accidents,buried on the farms with no reports made to the relevant authorities or relatives informed because some were coming from far regions,some from neighbouring countries with no next of kins known. We grew up hurting and hating. By the way, a  few years before we had witnessed the same farmers fighting on the side of the oppressive minority government. 


Our parents had told us the war of independence was over. The  majority had won the elections, so we would  now live  as EQUALS with everyone -- even free to be white farmers' neighbours . We had been told any one could stay anywhere they chose in the country.  Everyone was free to equally participate in the politics and economics of the country. This, I am sure ,had given our parents that confidence to purchase the farm right in the middle of the white farmers.  


As we grew older the more discrimination we witnessed the more daring we became. We deliberately started poaching wild animals on their farms, stealing any thing portable. Our aim was to inflict pain, to avenge the cruelties we witnessed every day.  We wanted to offload this anger that had built up inside of us from early years.   As youths, we started to challenge the guards -- sometimes physically chasing them around their farms. We became more and more daring with impunity.  Some of us got  arrested and served jail terms. Because there were many families on our farm , it meant there would be a time soon when the farm would not support all these families. The natural resources would dwindle and then get depleted completely at some point.  People were forced to trespass for basic commodities such as water and firewood. It meant more police visits, more arrests almost every day, court summons being the order of the day. Now keep all that in mind as I briefly take you back some few years as we,the young boys, participated in the armed liberation struggles. 


During those war times our basic duties were to check and monitor the enemy movements.   If we saw them , we would  run around looking for the freedom fighters in Zulu called oBhuti(our brothers). Remember we didn't have mobile phones then, so we relied on directions given to us by those who happened to have seen them passing by. A very tough laborious task for school going boys! All this was done during the time after school, the time meant for resting and home work.  The enemies knew about these tactics so it was very dangerous for us. Basically our job was to tell the best most accurate truth or information to our Bhutis and give the best and most deceiving lies to the enemy forces! This is still happening to the boys and young men in the war torn regions around Africa. Many young boys were and are killed in this exerc          ise -- some being accused of lack of full commitment and others accused of selling out.  The question is:  How  do boys serve in a country torn apart by a civil war, where both warring parties want his service?  It is  a very painful experience that affects, in a very negative way, his character, growth,  and parenting as a father.  These fathers become heartless -- no love at all. They just become cold. They are hurting with all the memories of pain -- memories of their loved ones killed, tortured, raped, humiliated, and ridiculed. They therefore in many cases become abusive to their spouses and children. 


Soon after independence we were faced with the fiercest challenge we had never experienced in our entire life. One liberation armed movement, an armed wing of the liberation party PF ZAPU, refused to demobilize, accusing the ZANU PF party that had won the first majority  elections, of rigging the elections. They instead decided to take up their arms and went back to the forests and mountains to fight the black government. The government retaliated by targeting all the leaders and supporters of the ZAPU party  who happened to be many of our parents.  I witnessed,for the first time,my mother physically beaten with a big log on her back. She sustained some very serious internal injuries and she limps up until right now.  Approximately 40 000 innocent unarmed citizens were killed -- their bodies thrown in the unused mines, in mountain caves , and in shallow mass graves.  Up  until NOW their remains haven't been exhumed. The same ruling party that committed those heinous crimes, which is still ruling, now refuses to deal with this matter. So many children were left parentless. Many people were left maimed, raped, and tortured.  Many were thrown in prisons without any charges.  The most targeted ones were the boys and the young men, who were accused of working for and with what they called the "dissidents".  Many young men were killed, tortured, and arrested.  Many were never to be seen again.  A number of boys and young men  left  their homes, dropped out of schools, and crossed the borders to the neighbouring countries like Botswana and South Africa where they are EQUALLY exposed to the next challenge: XENOPHOBIA. These same young boys are still the same targets by the same white farmers here in South Africa who intercept these boys on their way to the cities such as Johannesburg, force them to work on the farms, and after weeks of forced labour,  these farmers call the police who arrest them and deport them back UNPAID.  Now this is the vicious life cycle of the boys and young men in my country and region! What I have witnessed in Johannesburg is that many of these boys are involved in armed robberies and other vicious crimes. They are involved in the illicit use and selling of drugs. We see many of our young men committing suicide here in Johannesburg.  They are very stressed, jobs are scarce, and some have children to support. They are under so much  immense pressure. There are so many suicide cases and deaths from violent fights. They are hurting, confused, and helpless.  They can be arrested at any time because most of them have no legal documents. 


It is my sincere wish and hope therefore that with this little information and much more at our disposal the time will come when we will be able to tackle these challenges as a global village and free the young men and boys from this mental torture which is basically due to a human error and therefore it is us humans who should find the long lasting solutions that provide our young men and boys with what they rightfully deserve: FREEDOM AND HAPPINESS!

 I THANK YOU!

 

 

 

 

20 January, 2016

R. DEVIN BEVERLY, Ph.D., HEALTH AND FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGIST AND MEN'S ISSUES THOUGHT LEADER TO SPEAK AT MEN AND BOYS OF COLOR GLOBAL COMMUNITY EMOTIONAL HEALTH 1/24/2016 TELEPCONFERENCE




 

CONTACT: 

R. Devin Beverly, Ph.D.
Telephone: 757-239-0805
  
           RICHMOND, VA (USA) – 20 January 2016 --     How does racism, lack of real life options, poverty, lack of equal access to physical and mental health resources and support services, unemployment, and mass incarceration impact on the emotional health of Men and Boys of Color?   Are the unique challenges that Men and Boys of Color face robbing them of their emotional freedom?  Do Men and Boys of Color need a safe haven to freely express their wide range of emotions – particularly, the natural reaction to emotional and physical distress?   R. Devin Beverly, Ph.D., health and forensic psychologist and Men’s Issues Thought Leader, will weigh in on these and other questions as a featured speaker at the “Men And Boys Of Color Global Community Emotional Health” Teleconference scheduled for Sunday, 24 January 2016 at 10:00 A.M. (USA – New York Time) and 3:00 P.M. (USA – New York Time).   The teleconference call dial-in number is  712-775-7031 and the access code is: 803 828.  


            Dr. Beverly is moving the African American community to rethink how it is raising its Sons, healing their deep emotional wounds, and dissipating their anger through a groundbreaking DVD entitled, “Angry Black Males:  The Misunderstood Population”.  At the same time, Dr. Beverly is working to move the world to rethink how it can improve the manner in which it can positively interact with Men and Boys of Color and to understand why it is necessary.   Dr. Beverly’s work which was prominently featured in the Spring  2014 issue of IN SEARCH OF FATHERHOOD®, an international quarterly Fatherhood and Men’s Issues Journal, has been heralded as one of the key “pieces of the puzzle” to keeping not just African American boys and young adolescent males – but all of our Sons --  out of the “school-to-prison pipeline”.  A mental and behavioral health professional whose professional services encompasses, among other things, clinical leadership, consultation, organizational analysis, and interagency relations, Dr. Beverly deals with violence, alcoholism and other forms of chemical dependence, re-entry and other correctional programming, forensic psychology, and anti-social conduct.


        The “Men And Boys Of Color Global Community Emotional Health” Teleconference is being convened in observance of “January 2016: Men And Boys Emotional Freedom Month” which is the brainchild of the USA International Men’s Day Team in response to the alarmingly rising suicide rates for Men and Boys and in alignment with the theme for 2016 International Men’s Day  -- “Talk About Male Suicide”..   “January 2016:  Men And Boys Emotional Freedom Month” calls attention to, among other things, the need for the creation of safe havens for Men and Boys to freely express their wide range of emotions  and greater and equal access to mental health resources and support for services for our sons, fathers, husbands, grandfathers, great grandfathers, uncles, fiancées, brothers, cousins, nephews, co-workers, and neighbors. 


19 January, 2016

GLOBAL PARENTING NETWORK CEO MR. GREGORY JOHNSON TO MODERATE "MEN AND BOYS OF COLOR GLOBAL COMMUNITY HEALTH 1/24/2016 TELECONFERENCE

 

P R E S S    R E L E A S E
 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT:  
MR. GREGORY JOHNSON
CEO – GLOBAL PARENTING NETWORK
President's Volunteer Service Award
OHIO (USA) REGIONAL COORDINATOR – INTERNATIONAL MEN’S DAY
Ohio (USA) Affiliate - Attachment Parenting International \
Ohio (USA) Affiliate - Fathers and Families Coalition of America
E-Mail:  gpnetwork@live.com
Phone: 803-218-0164


           CLEVELAND, OHIO (USA)19 JANUARY 2016 --     How does racism, lack of real life options, poverty, lack of equal access to physical and mental health resources and support services, unemployment, and mass incarceration impact on the emotional health of Men and Boys of Color?   Are the unique challenges that Men and Boys of Color face robbing them of their emotional freedom?  Do Men and Boys of Color need a safe haven to freely express their wide range of emotions – particularly, the natural reaction to emotional and physical distress?   MR. GREGORY JOHNSON, CEO of Global Parenting Network, member of the American Psychology Association, Executive Manager, publisher, public speaker, researcher, leadership and executive coach, organizational development specialist and the Ohio (USA) Regional Coordinator for 2016 International Men’s Day, will moderate the “Men And Boys Of Color Global Community Emotional Health” Teleconference scheduled for Sunday, 24 January 2016 at 10:00 A.M. (USA – New York Time) and 3:00 P.M. (USA – New York Time).   The teleconference call dial-in number is  712-775-7031 and the access code is: 803 828.   


           MR. GREGORY JOHNSON is one of the more active advocates for Fatherhood in the United States.  He is associated with domestic and international Fatherhood organizations and networks that share information and further the important mission of Fatherhood and the responsibilities to children and families.  In 2000, MR. JOHNSON  and his late wife, DR. THERESA MEJIA-JOHNSON formed a non-profit titled I Am A Dream for the express purpose of providing Fatherhood and Family information through workshops, newsletters, public speaking and networking throughout numerous communities in the United States and the World.  MR. JOHNSON and his late wife also launched a publishing venture – a bimonthly parenting magazine for Fathers called Fathers Perspective.  He has spoken and written on the subject of Fatherhood in many locations throughout the United States, including Phoenix, Albuquerque, Washington, D.C., West Palm Beach, Denver, Orlando, Tampa, St. Petersburg, Columbus, Cleveland and others.                           
                              
          Currently, MR. JOHNSON serves as the Principal Partner and Chief Executive Officer of the Concentric Leadership Institute and is the former President and Chief Officer of the Pinellas County Urban League in St. Petersburg, Florida and former Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of the Urban League of Greater Cleveland in Cleveland, Ohio.  In addition, he has had a successful career in the health care industry which has spanned nearly 20 years in various professional capacities such as Vice President of Mercy Hospitals, Administrator of Rheumatic & Immunologic Disease at Cleveland Clinic and Manager of Business Operations for Hanna Pavilion of University Hospitals of Cleveland.  He has also served as the State Director of the March of Dimes in Ohio.

        The “Men And Boys Of Color Global Community Emotional Health” Teleconference is being convened in observance of “January 2016: Men And Boys Emotional Freedom Month” which is the brainchild of the USA International Men’s Day Team in response to the alarmingly rising suicide rates for Men and Boys and in alignment with the theme for 2016 International Men’s Day  -- “Talk About Male Suicide”.   “January 2016:  Men And Boys Emotional Freedom Month” calls attention to, among other things, the need for the creation of safe havens for Men and Boys to freely express their wide range of emotions  and greater and equal access to mental health resources and support for services for our sons, fathers, husbands, grandfathers, great grandfathers, uncles, fiancées, brothers, cousins, nephews, co-workers, and neighbors.  

15 January, 2016

MEN AND BOYS OF COLOR EMOTIONAL FREEDOM MONTH GLOBAL FORUM - 24 JANUARY 2016 AT 10:00 AM AND 3:00 PM (USA - NEW YORK TIME)

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HOW DOES NEGATIVE STEREOTYPING, VIOLENCE, LACK OF REAL LIFE OPTIONS,

POVERTY, AND MASS INCARCERATION IMPACT ON THE EMOTIONAL HEALTH  OF

MEN AND BOYS OF COLOR?


 
WHAT DOES "EMOTIONAL FREEDOM" MEAN TO MEN AND BOYS OF COLOR?
 


YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO PARTICIPATE IN AN
 EMOTIONAL FREEDOM MONTH GLOBAL FORUM
FOR MEN AND BOYS OF COLOR


SUNDAY, 24 JANUARY 2016  TELEPHONE CONFERENCE CALL
10:00 AM (USA – NEW YORK TIME) AND 3:00 PM (USA – NEW YORK TIME)

 TELEPHONE CONFERENCE CALL NUMBER:  712-775-7031
ACCESS CODE 803 828



11 January, 2016

2016 INTERNATIONAL MEN'S DAY: TALK ABOUT MALE SUICIDE

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          BRIGHTON, UNITED KINGDOM – 11JANUARY  2016   - This year International Men’s Day, which is held on Saturday 19th November 2016, coincides with International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day.  To help the world mark these two observance days, we are inviting men and women all over the world to join us in adopting the official International Men’s Day Theme for 2015:  “Talk About Male Suicide”.
 
 
The “Talk About Male Suicide” theme highlights the fact that more than 800,000 people die from suicide every year and that in over 99% of countries, the majority of people who take their own lives are men and boys.
 
 
 Every 40 seconds someone dies from suicide.
 
 
In the United Kingdom, for example, men are nearly four times more likely to kill themselves with 13 men dying from suicide every day.
 
 
In the United States, approximately 42,773 Americans committed suicide --- 77%  of these suicides were committed by Men.
 
 
In Trinidad and Tobago, the suicide rate is higher than the global average with Men accounting for 76% suicides in that nation (http://www.guardian.co.tt/news/2014-09--10/tt-suicide-rates-higher-regional-global-averges%ES%80%94who)
 
 
 
International Men’s Day invites all people, all over the globe, to use 19th November 2016 to start a national conversation about male suicide in your country.
 
 
Why are our sons, brothers, fathers, uncles, grandfathers, husbands, partners, male friends and family members, more likely to take their own lives? What causes men and boys to kill themselves? What can we do collectively to reduce the number of men and boy who die every year form suicide?  We can only begin to find answers to these questions if we “Talk About Male Suicide”.
 
 
International Men’s Day recognizes that there are a broad variety of laws, values and viewpoints around the world that affect different men, in different countries in different ways. There is also a diversity of opinions about those laws, values and viewpoints which are held by the many different men, women, girls and boys throughout the world.
 
 
International Men’s Day encourages people to listen respectfully to a diversity of viewpoints as we encourage the world to “Talk About Male Suicide” on 19th November 2016.
 
 
As a day of observance we place our focus on that which unites humanity- giving everyone who wants to celebrate International Men’s Day the opportunity to help work towards our shared objectives which we apply equally to men and boys irrespective of their age, ability, social background, ethnicity, sexuality, gender identity, religious belief and relationship status.
 

Those objectives are:
 
  • To promote positive male role models; not just movie stars and sports men but everyday, working class men who are living decent, honest lives.
 
  • To celebrate men’s positive contributions; to society, community, family, marriage, child care, and to the environment
 
  • To focus on men’s health and wellbeing; social, emotional, physical and spiritual
 
  • To highlight discrimination against males; in areas of social services, social attitudes and expectations, and law
 
  • To improve gender relations and promote gender equality
 
  • To create a safer, better world, where all people can grow and reach their full potential.
 
 
Finding new, innovative and effective ways to engage every individual and organisation in the world in a conversation about male suicide is just one way people can further the objectives of International Men’s Day in 2016.
 
 
International Men’s Day welcomes everyone who is willing to “Talk About Male Suicide” and listen respectfully to what people with a diversity of viewpoints have to say on the subject, to join us in marking the day on 19th November 2016.
 
 
In particular we invite people to listen respectfully to the voices of men with lived experience of male suicide and those bereaved or affected by the loss of male suicide as they “Talk About Male Suicide” on International Men’s Day.
 

07 January, 2016

IS "MEN AND BOYS EMOTIONAL FREEDOM MONTH" NECESSARY?


January 2016 has been designated as "Men and Boys Emotional Freedom Month".  Now, some may ask, is a "Men and Boys Emotional Freedom Month" necessary? 


Well, let's see....


On Tuesday, 5 January 2016, United States President, The Honorable Barack H. Obama held a press conference at the White House during which he gave a very emotional speech on gun violence in America.  The press conference is a prelude to a Town Hall Meeting he is scheduled to conduct on gun violence in the United States during the evening of Thursday, 7 January 2016.  So, what did the American media have to say about the President's speech on gun violence?  Here a few samples:


CNN.COM - President Obama Sheds Tears During Gun Speech

THE WASHINGTON POST - President Obama Cried In Public Today

TIME MAGAZINE - Why Obama Cries Over Gun Control

U.S NEWS & WORLD REPORT - President Obama Cries During Gun Control Speech